Windows on ARMThere's been a lot of buzz in recent weeks over the future of Windows, particularly the notion that Microsoft will kill off Windows RT. These claims are overhyped and built largely on semantics. Though Windows RT might not survive in name, you can expect it to remain a part of Microsoft's catalogue for the foreseeable future.

Windows on ARMMicrosoft caused a stir earlier this week when an executive appeared to hint that it might kill off Windows RT, the version of its Windows 8 platform that runs on ARM-based devices. But what would this mean for Microsoft's mobile strategy and its remaining Windows platforms if this happened?

Windows on ARMThere’s been a lot of talk in the press over the past few days that Microsoft is planning to kill off RT, its ARM version of Windows. Speculation about the future of the tablet OS has been rife for ages. Five months ago I declared, "Stick a fork in it, Windows RT is done" and although the OS is still with us -- thanks mostly to its inclusion in Surface and Surface 2 -- its days look to remain numbered.

Windows on ARMMicrosoft look set to ditch Windows RT, its version of Windows for tablet which runs on Arm-based processors rather than Intel, according to comments made by a senior executive at the company.

Windows on ARMI've had a love-hate relationship with Windows RT ever since Microsoft unveiled a prototype at CES in January 2011. But with its future now on shaky ground I can't help but feel that Microsoft is itself hammering the nails into the operating system's coffin, and that this may be huge mistake.

Windows on ARMMicrosoft looks ready to kill off Windows RT, its version of Windows devised for chips based on ARM's architecture, judging by remarks by senior executive Julie Larson-Green.

Windows on ARMWindows RT is a mess, and Microsoft now admits it. The company's head of hardware, Julie Larson-Green, sat down at the UBS Technology Summit last week (via wmpoweruser) and pretty much admitted that Windows RT was a total disaster.

Windows on ARMSomewhere in Redmond (at least metaphorically speaking) are several very large piles of unsold Surface RT tablet components. Why did the long-awaited and much-hyped ARM tablet running "Windows for ARM" Windows RT flop so badly, when ARM tablets running iOS for ARM from Apple are doing so well?

Windows on ARMMicrosoft now has a well-qualified hardware partner, software that’s matured rapidly in the last year, and a complete set of Office functionality -- but is Windows RT even relevant?

Windows on ARMWhen you think about the eventual unification of the Windows RT and Windows Phone platforms, a number of thoughts probably go through your mind. But such a grand vision requires smaller, more pragmatic steps, especially in the early stages. The first such step was the unification of the Store infrastructure for both platforms. And the second step was announced this week, with Microsoft now unifying the developer programs for Windows Store and Windows Phone.

Windows on ARMI didn't realize that the version of Outlook 2013 RT that came bundled with the RTM version of Windows 8.1 RT was still officially a preview release. Update: Actually, this seems NOT to be the case. I've asked Microsoft if yesterday's blog post is just a reposting of a past entry. It looks as if Outlook 2013 RT already had RTM'd as I thought originally. Stay tuned for Microsoft's official response.

Windows on ARMEarlier this week, we were tipped to a page on Microsoft's Surface website claiming that the official Surface Ethernet adapter could finally work on the Surface and Surface 2 tablets if they used Windows RT 8.1. Unfortunately, Microsoft later told us the information on that page was incorrect and removed that statement from the site.

Windows on ARMIt’s hard to believe that almost three years have passed since I wrote my first blog entry discussing Windows running on the ARM processor. Over that time, we’ve seen an increasing onslaught of client devices (tablets and phones) running on ARM, and we’ve watched Windows expand to several Windows RT-based devices, and retract back to the Surface RT and Surface 2 being the only ARM-based Windows tablets, and now with the impending Nokia 2520 being the only non-Microsoft (and the only non-Nvidia) Windows RT tablets – that is, for as long as Nokia isn’t a part of Microsoft.

Windows on ARMMicrosoft rolled out the Windows RT 8.1 update on October 17, but the company pulled it from the Store shortly after that due to a number of issues discovered on several devices, including its very own Surface RT.

Windows on ARMA number of people who own the original Surface RT tablet (now known just as Surface) have not had a lot of luck when it comes to updating the tablet to Windows RT 8.1. Microsoft pulled that update from the Windows Store a couple of days after it was released because it was bricking some Surface RT devices. Microsoft put the update back in the store earlier this week.


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Windows on ARM - Windows RT