Windows on ARMIt really should have been obvious, but in case you were confused, ARM versions of Windows 8 will not be able to run x86 apps and vice-versa. In fact, Microsoft has said as much in the past. This is a model Microsoft has used unsuccessfully in the past, but are things different now? Will ISVs make more than one binary?

Windows on ARMIntel will be as strong as ever despite the emergence of an alternative platform for Windows 8. That's my forecast after bouncing between Northern and Southern California this week and attending two major tech conferences--the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco and the BUILD conference in Anaheim.

Windows on ARMOne of the first things Windows 8 chief Steven Sinofsky said in the Build keynote this week was that all the demos were “equally at home on ARM and on x86.” However, besides that statement and our brief look at the Developer Preview running on an Nvidia quad-core Kal-El reference tablet, Microsoft remained relatively tight-lipped on the new architecture support – especially on when it will release the ARM version of Win 8 to developers and how it plans to address the fact that future ARM PCs won’t run x86 desktop apps.

Windows on ARMIf Windows 8 works successfully on ARM-processor-equipped systems, expect to see thin, light, and innovative devices coming our way. Such devices would include ultrathin laptops with impressive battery life, and superlight, large-screen tablets.

Windows on ARMWindows 8 ARM PCs will not, in fact, have full app compatibility with software designed for x86 Windows 7 and 8 computers, Microsoft has confirmed, instead demanding that developers port their titles over to the new architecture. Despite earlier suggestions that seemed to indicate otherwise, Windows president Steven Sinofsky clarified during an analyst Q&A this week that while new apps coded for the Metro UI will work on both x86 and ARM tablets, laptops and other computers, existing software will not.

Windows on ARMApps written for x86 Windows PCs won't be able to run on ARM-based Win 8 tablets, according to a Microsoft exec who says his earlier statements about cross-platform compatibility were misinterpreted. - In a clarification, a Microsoft executive said x86 applications built to run on the desktop version of Windows 8 won't be compatible with the tablet version of the operating system. The executive also said that the tablet version won't be able run any applications built for previous versions of Windows.

Windows on ARMIntel is trying as hard as it can to promote its Atom processors for tablet use, and recently the Santa Clara chip giant unveiled a series of benchmark that compare its single-core Z670 CPU with a dual-core ARM-based SoC, the Intel chip proving to be faster than its counterpart in all tests run.

Windows on ARMWintel is dead. On simultaneous stages Tuesday, Microsoft showed Windows running on Qualcomm's ARM-based processors and Intel embraced Google's Android OS. Old patterns have been broken; new alliances are forming. And of the four companies involved, it's Intel who should continue to be scared.

Windows on ARMWhile the x86 version of the Windows 8 Developer Preview was released last night and attendees were given Intel Core i5-powered tablets, there’s been very few public demos of the new OS on ARM devices here at Build. And while we’d love to say that’s changing today, it seems all the Win 8 ARM devices are being guarded quite closely. Reference design tablets running the Developer Preview from Nvidia, TI, and Qualcomm are now on display at the show, but sadly, most of them are behind glass with just the Start screen showing.

Windows on ARMWell, talk about being in the right place at the right time: We just ran into VP of Windows Planning Michael Angiulo at the Nvidia booth, who was kind enough to snatch that quad-core Kal-El tablet from its glass cage and let us play a bit with Windows 8 on ARM. We’ll admit, it wasn’t a very in-depth demo, but we were able to see snappy transitions between the Desktop and Metro interfaces.

Windows on ARMWith the BUILD Conference in full swing, much of the talk surrounding the tech industry right now has to do with Microsoft. And as of late, quite a bit of the attention has surrounded Microsoft's partnership with ARM. Under the terms of the deal, Windows 8 will work with ARM processors, paving the way for mobile-device makers to use Windows in a new way.

Windows on ARMFor many years, the market for personal computing equipment was dominated by the Wintel "duopoly." But no more. In practice, Wintel wasn't so much two companies scheming together as it was a marriage of convenience pairing two dominant technologies: Microsoft's Windows operating system and Intel's x86 processor family.

Windows on ARMExclusive: Windows chief talks ARM vs Intel and Metro vs desktop - What we've seen at the Microsoft Build conference this week has been Windows 8 running on familiar, if stylish x86 PCs, with the occasional glimpse of prototype ARM hardware from Qualcomm and Nvidia.

Windows on ARMShares of ARM jumped by more than four per cent yesterday after Microsoft showcased a slew of tablets, both ARM-based and Intel-based, running the company's next generation operating system, Windows 8, at its BUILD developer conference.

Windows on ARMIDG News Service - While Microsoft is embracing the ARM processor architecture for its next Windows client operating system, Windows 8, the company has no immediate plans to develop an ARM-based version of its next Windows Server, the company executive in charge of Windows Server confirmed Wednesday.


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Windows on ARM - Windows RT